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Record of Decision System (RODS)

NAVAL SURFACE WARFARE CENTER - DAHLGREN

Abstract

Site Name:  NAVAL SURFACE WARFARE CENTER - DAHLGREN
Address:  2 MI E OF INTER 301 & 206 
City & State:  DAHLGREN  VA  22448
County:  KING GEORGE
 
EPA ID:  VA7170024684
EPA Region:  03
 
NPL Status:  Currently on the Final NPL
 
ROD Type:  Record of Decision
ROD ID:  EPA/541/R-99/062
ROD Date:  09/27/1999
Operable Unit(s):  09
 
Contaminant:  Metals, PAH, Pesticides
 
Abstract:  According to an U.S. Environmental Protection Agency study of aerial photographs, bridge, and road building activities in the immediate vicinity of Hideaway Pond began during the late 1930s and early 1940s. In 1953 the bridge and road across the drainage were combined to form a dam that caused the stream to flood to the north. By 1981, flooding had begun south of the dam, and in 1983 a new dam was constructed approximately 400 feet north of Bagby Road. The area between the new dam and the original dam was flooded and the old roadway and dam that formed the original pond were largely removed.

Other activities that occurred upstream (near the tributaries draining into Hideaway Pond) included the construction of Building 1400. Another area upstream of Hideaway Pond, just north of Building 1400 and south of U.S. Highway 301, was used for 8 years in the early 1970s as a sanitary landfill operation (Site 17, 1400 Area Landfill) following excavation activities associated with gravel mining. Two streams that flow south on either side of Site 17 merge and continue south into Hideaway Pond. Wastes at Site 17 include primarily municipal garbage, which was deposited, compacted, and covered on a periodic basis.

Recreational fishing in Hideaway Pond was permitted until 1980, when the NSWCDL requested that fish tissue samples be tested in an attempt to substantiate an anonymous report that Hideaway Pond might be contaminated with mercury. A catch-and-release policy was instituted after mercury was found in the fish. In 1990, the majority of the pond was drained in an attempt to change the fish community from dominance by gizzard shad to a bluegill-largemouth bass community. There were no special efforts made to remove all the fish, however, most of the fish were either released downstream or perished at the site. The pond was subsequently refilled and restocked for catch-and-release only. At present, recreational fishing occurs on occasion; however, restrictions p
rohibit the consumption of fish because of the potential presence of mercury. Fishing is allowed on a catch-and-release basis only, and signs are posted at the pond prohibiting consumption of the fish. Analysis of the fish has continued on an annual basis.

No enforcement actions have been taken at Site 10. The Navy has owned the property since 1918 and is identified as the responsible party.

Other activities that occurred upstream (near the tributaries draining into Hideaway Pond) included the construction of Building 1400. Another area upstream of Hideaway Pond, just north of Building 1400 and south of U.S. Highway 301, was used for 8 years in the early 1970s as a sanitary landfill operation (Site 17, 1400 Area Landfill) following excavation activities associated with gravel mining. Two streams that flow south on either side of Site 17 merge and continue south into Hideaway Pond. Wastes at Site 17 include primarily municipal garbage, which was deposited, compacted, and covered on a periodic basis.
 
Remedy:  This remedial action chosen for Operable Unit (OU) 9 includes excavation of nearly 370 cubic yards of contaminated soil covering a area of approximately 2500 square feet from the French Drain area and 9,200 cubic yards of contaminated soil covering an area of approximately 122,000 square feet from the source area. The excavated soil will be tested to determine if it is a hazardous waste or non-hazardous waste and will be tested prior to offsite disposal in either a RCRA Subtitle C or D facility. The areas where soil is removed will then be backfilled with the appropriate type of soil for that location. Once backfilling has taken place, this area will then be revegetated. Areas where wetlands once existed will be replaced with plants and shrubs that were previously there. Implementations of this remedy will make the site available for unrestricted land and ground water use.

Estimated Capital Cost: $1,517,000(1) or $2,049,100(2)
Estimated Annual O&M Cost: $0
Estimated Present Net Worth Cost: $1,517,000(1) or $2,049,100(2)

Assumes all soil/material disposal at subtitle D landfill. Assumes French-Drain material and hotspot soil disposal at Subtitle C landfill and remaining soil disposal at subtitle D landfill. Under the Alternative 1, the site is essentially abandoned. No further evaluation of conditions would occur. Alternative 1 serves as a baseline against which the ability of other alternatives to meet remedial action objectives is evaluated

Net Present Worth: $15,550 - estimated admin. cost of 5-year reviews over a 30-year period.
 
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