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Record of Decision System (RODS)

MIG/DEWANE LANDFILL

Abstract

Site Name:  MIG/DEWANE LANDFILL
Address:  BUSINESS RTE 20E 
City & State:  BELVIDERE  IL  61008
County:  BOONE
 
EPA ID:  ILD980497788
EPA Region:  05
 
NPL Status:  Currently on the Final NPL
 
ROD Type:  Record of Decision
ROD ID:  EPA/541/R-00/088
ROD Date:  03/31/2000
Operable Unit(s):  01
 
Abstract:  CLOSED LANDFILL WITH LAGOON THREATENING TO OVERFLOW.

MIG/DeWane Landfill, also known as Boone Landfill, Bonus Landfill, or Kennedy Landfill is located in Boone County, Illinois approximately 0.25 miles east of the City of Belvidere and 0.5 miles north of Business United States (U.S.) Route 20. The landfill is located primarily in the south half of the southeastern quarter of Section 30, Township 44 North, Range 4 East.

The MIG/DeWane Landfill site occupies an area of approximately 47 acres and rises to a height of approximately 50 to 55 feet above the surrounding terrain. The site consists of a landfill and a leachate surface impoundment. The surface impoundment was constructed to receive leachate from the landfill's gravity flow, leachate collection system. The site is bounded on the north by the Chicago and Northwestern railroad tracks and the Commonwealth Edison right-of-way. Agricultural and commercial properties are located to the east and south of the landfill. A soil borrow pit, used to provide soil for the landfill's interim cap, is immediately adjacent to the west of the landfill. Further west of the landfill is a housing development. North of the railroad tracks is an agricultural field that extends to the Kishwaukee River.

The site contains a municipal landfill that received residential, municipal, commercial, and industrial wastes for disposal. The MIG/DeWane Landfill is classified as a Type I landfill. A Type I landfill is a co-disposal facility where hazardous wastes were diposed of with municipal solid wastes. At these types of landfills, discrete "hot spots" are neither known nor suspected to be present. Hot spots consist of highly toxic and/or highly mobile material, and present a potential principal threat to human health and the environment. There are no known or suspected constituents in the groundwater.

A Remedial Investigation and Feasibility Study (RI/FS) was conducted at the MIG/DeWane Landfill site under an Administrative Order by Consent (AOC or Consent Order) which was signed
in May 1991. This Consent Order was signed by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA), the State, and numerous Potentially Responsible Parties (PRPs). The RI/FS was conducted by the PRPs, with oversight by the State and U.S. EPA, and was completed in February 1999. During the RI/FS, the U.S. EPA was the lead agency for the enforcement-related activities associated with the site and the State was lead agency for overseeing the technical activities.

The MIG/DeWane Landfill operated from 1969 until 1988. The landfill was permitted to receive residential, municipal, commercial and industrial wastes. With the enactment of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) regulations in 1980/82, however, the wastes received by the landfill were later restricted to non-hazardous. The landfill activities (or lack thereof) that led to the current problems at the landfill include, the disposal of various types of wastes as well as the improper covering of the landfill wastes.

From at least 1968 to 1983, the landfill property was owned by Mr. Raymond DeWane and Ms. Jean Farina (and, until his death, Mr. John L. DeWane). In 1983, the property ownership was transferred to a Trust. In 1991, ownership of the property was transferred to L.A.E., directly. Raymond E. DeWane and Jean A. Farina are the sole L.A.E. shareholders.

From 1969 to 1988 the property was operated as a landfill by various individuals and companies.

In February 1969, the landfill was registered with the State and disposal operations began in the gravel pit. The State landfill permits required the placement of a five-foot compacted clay liner across the bottom of the pit, and vertically along the sidewalls. Wastes received were to be disposed of into the clay lined area, compacted, and covered with soil to form a cell. Each daily cell was to be covered by six inches of soil. These and other permit requirements were required in an effort to protect the underlying groundwater from contamination by the waste disposal. Groundwater monitoring wells were installed at various times and locations.
 
Remedy:  The selected remedy is the common non-cap remedial action components and the Alterntative 4A cap. The non-cap and cap Alternative 4A remedial actions include the following:

- Institutional controls in the form of future land-use and groundwater use restrictions for the landfill Site and areas west and north of the Site.
- Closure of the surface impoundment through the removal of all leachate liquids for off-site treatment and disposal.
- Excavation and consolidation of leachate surface impoundment sediments under a new multi-layer landfill cap.
- Construction of a new multi-layer landfill cap to cover and contain landfill wastes, minimizing the infiltration of precipitation to reduce leachate generation.
- Monitored natural attenuation of groundwater to attain groundwater chemical-specific ARARs (i.e., Illinois Class I groundwater quality criteria) and long-term groundwater monitoring.
- Leachate monitoring of hydrostatic conditions within the landfill interior and off-site landfill gas monitoring to the west of the Site.
- The continued operation, maintenance, monitoring, and evaluation of the gas collection system. This system is comprised of extraction wells and a gas interceptor trench (installed and operating since May 1999), located west of the landfill and designed to meet the ARAR standards and be protective of the residential homes located west of the soil borrow pit area. This portion of the remedy will be operated in the active mode until such time as it can be demonstrated by offsite monitoring and data evaluation efforts that landfill gas migration no longer poses a concern to potential residential exposure points or an exceedence of ARAR standards.
- Enhancement of the present gas collection system with passive gas extraction wells to be located within the interior of the landfill.
- Active leachate removal using the existing leachate removal system that underlies the eastern portion of the landfill site and a system of either permeable bed layers or side slope drainage trenches, with the potential for contingent leachate removal upgrade options, constructed in major seep areas along the northern and western portions of the landfill, will occur and be subject to further study, and evaluation of hydrostatic conditions during the Pre-Design phase.
- Enhancement of the present gas collection system with passive gas extraction wells to be located within the interior of the landfill.
- Active leachate removal using the existing leachate removal system that underlies the eastern portion of the landfill site and a system of either permeable bed layers or side slope drainage trenches, with the potential for contingent leachate removal upgrade options, constructed in major seep areas along the northern and western portions of the landfill, will occur and be subject to further study, and evaluation of hydrostatic conditions during the Pre-Design phase.
 
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