Superfund

Site Information for
GULF COAST VACUUM SERVICES

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Staying Informed and Involved

The public is invited to read and review the Site’s five-year review reports. The National Contingency Plan requires review of remedial actions that result in any hazardous substances, pollutants or contaminants remaining at a site above levels that allow for unlimited use and unrestricted exposure every five years to ensure the protection of human health and the environment. EPA will complete the fourth five-year review for the Site by September 2013.

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Are there risks at the site now?

Risks and pathways addressed by the cleanup include health risks from people ingesting or touching contaminants in soil, sediment and groundwater.

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Emergency Response and Removal Program

Cleanup has also included three removal actions, or short-term cleanups, to address immediate threats to human health and the environment. In March 1990, EPA constructed a containment levee along the West Pit to prevent off-site migration of contaminated liquid. EPA also pumped out wastewater and treated it prior to discharge. In February and March 1991 and April 1992, EPA pumped out additional wastewater and treated it prior to discharge. EPA also constructed a fence.


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Redevelopment Activity

The 12.8-acre Gulf Coast Vacuum Services Superfund site is located near the town of Abbeville, Louisiana. Starting in 1969, Gulf Coast Vacuum Services (GCVS) operated a vacuum truck facility and stored oil drilling mud on site. These operations involved dumping waste materials and disposing of used rinse water in on-site pits. These waste disposal practices contaminated soil and groundwater. In 1980, after a citizen’s complaint, EPA investigated site conditions and found crude oil residues in soil and groundwater. A few years later, GCVS declared bankruptcy, and EPA added the site to the Superfund program’s National Priorities List (NPL) in 1989. Cleanup activities included on-site soil stabilization and installation of a clay cover over contaminated sediments. About 8 acres of the site are now clean and suitable for unlimited use. In September 1999, the site owners and the Vermilion Parish Police Jury (VPPJ) entered into an agreement that grants VPPJ access and use of the site. Currently VPPJ uses part of the site for vehicle maintenance activities. This reuse ensures that the access roads and gates will be maintained. EPA deleted the site from the NPL in July 2001.


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