Superfund Information Systems: Site Profile

Superfund Site:

CURCIO SCRAP METAL, INC.
SADDLE BROOK TWP, NJ

Cleanup Activities

On this page:

On related pages:


Background

The Curcio Scrap Metal, Inc. (CSMI) site is located in Saddle Brook Township, New Jersey. The 1-acre site is an active scrap metal yard that contains 10,950 square feet of warehouse and office space. CSMI and Cirello Iron and Steel Company (CISC) recycle scrap iron, copper, aluminum and other ferrous and non-ferrous metals at this active yard. In 1982, CSMI received shipments of 50 electrical transformers. While cutting the transformers, oil containing polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) spilled on the ground. Groundwater and soil were also contaminated with heavy metals and volatile organic compounds (VOCs). VOCs are potentially harmful contaminants that can easily evaporate into the air. Soil cleanup has been completed. Groundwater cleanup is ongoing.

The 1-acre Curcio Scrap Metal, Inc. (CSMI) site is an active scrap metal yard that contains 10,950 square feet of warehouse and office space. CSMI and Cirello Iron and Steel Company (CISC) recycle scrap iron, copper, aluminum, and other ferrous and non-ferrous metals on this active yard. In 1982, CSMI received shipments of 50 electrical transformers and, while cutting the transformers, oil containing polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) spilled onto the ground. The State became aware of the site in 1982 when a citizen became concerned over CSMI's activities. The State found the soil and runoff from a drainage ditch to be contaminated with PCBs. In 1985, the State discovered an oil spill that flowed from the site to a pond approximately 300 feet from the Curcio site and determined that CISC was responsible for the spill. The company spilled approximately 200 gallons of hydraulic fluid on the CSMI site. Approximately 30,000 people depend on public wells within 3 miles of the site as their sole source of drinking water. An estimated 1,000 to 3,000 people live within a 1-mile radius, with the closest residence being 300 feet from the site. The site is located above the Brunswick Aquifer. Schroeders Brook is located nearby. Site Responsibility: This site is being addressed through Federal and potentially responsible parties' actions.

Top of Page


What Has Been Done to Clean Up the Site?

Preliminary investigations to determine the nature and extent of contamination present at the Curcio Scrap Metal, Inc. site have been performed. Further investigations revealed that site soils were heavily contaminated with PCBs and heavy metals.

Soil cleanup activities started in September 1993. Within four months, about 3,400 tons of contaminated soil was dug up and disposed of off site at permitted disposal facilities. In addition, about 20,000 gallons of contaminated water was collected, treated and transported off site for disposal. The excavated area was then backfilled and graded and a concrete pad installed. Soil cleanup finished in 1994.

In September 1997, EPA issued a Record of Decision (ROD) for the groundwater phase of this Site cleanup. The ROD called for no further action with long-term groundwater monitoring. In September 1999, EPA issued an Order under which the Potentially Responsible Party performed five years of groundwater monitoring. The required long-term groundwater monitoring began in March 2000. The long-term groundwater monitoring results indicate low levels of VOCs in two of the overburden wells, including benzene and TCE. Also, aluminum, arsenic, lead, iron, manganese and sodium are the metals that were detected at concentrations that exceed the state and federal standards.

Overall, EPA has determined that while conditions at the site are relatively stable, some contaminants have been detected above State and Federal Standards and the monitoring program will continue. In April 2005, EPA issued an Amendment to the September 1999 Order under which the Potenentially Responsible Party continued to perform long-term groundwater monitoring for an additional five years. A Second Amendment to the September 1999 Order was issued in Spring 2011 to continue long-term groundwater monitoring for an additional five years. In August 2016, a Third Amendment to the 1999 AOC was executed to continue the groundwater monitoring program at the Site. This amendment includes groundwater sampling to occur every four years.

In December 2006, the Potentially Resposible Party filed a Classification Exception Area (CEA) application with NJDEP. The CEA was established by NJDEP in October 2008.

Top of Page


What Is the Current Site Status?

The site is being addressed in two remedial phases. The first phase focused on cleanup of the soil. The second phase focuses on surface water and groundwater cleanup.

Soil: EPA selected a remedy for contaminated soil in the site’s June 1991 Record of Decision, or ROD. It included the excavation and off-site disposal of about 1,800 cubic yards of contaminated soil. EPA updated the remedy in August 1992 to include disposal of a portion of the contaminated soil at an appropriate off-site facility.

Surface Water and Groundwater: In June 1995, the contaminated surface water and sediment area of nearby Schroeder's Brook was cleaned up. Activities included the excavation and off-site disposal of 145 tons of solidified PCB-contaminated stream sediments and standing surface water. The excavated area was backfilled and restored to form a rock-level channel that meets New Jersey's erosion and sediment control standards.

Following several years of sampling, EPA issued a ROD for site groundwater in September 1997. The ROD called for no further action with long-term groundwater monitoring. Long-term monitoring started in March 2000 and is ongoing.

 

Top of Page


Activity and Use Limitations

At this site, activity and use limitations that EPA calls institutional controls are in place. Institutional controls play an important role in site remedies because they reduce exposure to contamination by limiting land or resource use. They also guide human behavior. For instance, zoning restrictions prevent land uses – such as residential uses – that are not consistent with the level of cleanup.

For more background, see Institutional Controls.

 

In December 2006, the Potentially Resposible Party filed a Classification Exception Area (CEA) application with NJDEP. The CEA was established by NJDEP in October 2008.

Top of Page


Sampling and Monitoring

During this FYR period (2012-2016), no VOCs were detected above NJDEP GWQS in MW-1R, MW-2, and MW-3R. MW-3R and MW-4R are situated in the downgradient edge of the Site and prior to 2010, MW-3R showed consistently detected low levels of benzene above the NJDEP GWQS during each sampling event. During this FYR period, TCE is the only remaining VOC of concern and it has been most persistent in groundwater samples collected from MW-4R with concentrations ranging between 4.4 ppb and 8 ppb, while TCE degradation products (i.e. cis-1,2-DCE, vinyl chloride) have remained below the NJDEP GWQS.

Top of Page


Enforcement Information

 

In September 1997, EPA issued a Record of Decision (ROD) for the groundwater phase of this Site cleanup. The ROD called for no further action with long-term groundwater monitoring. In September 1999, EPA issued an Order under which the Potentially Responsible Party performed five years of groundwater monitoring. The required long-term groundwater monitoring began in March 2000. The long-term groundwater monitoring results indicate low levels of VOCs in two of the overburden wells, including benzene and TCE. Also, aluminum, arsenic, lead, iron, manganese and sodium are the metals that were detected at concentrations that exceed the state and federal standards.

Overall, EPA has determined that while conditions at the site are relatively stable, some contaminants have been detected above State and Federal Standards and the monitoring program will continue. In April 2005, EPA issued an Amendment to the September 1999 Order under which the Potenentially Responsible Party continued to perform long-term groundwater monitoring for an additional five years. A Second Amendment to the September 1999 Order was issued in Spring 2011 to continue long-term groundwater monitoring for an additional five years. In August 2016, a Third Amendment to the 1999 AOC was executed to continue the groundwater monitoring program at the Site. This amendment includes groundwater sampling to occur every four years.

Top of Page