Superfund Information Systems: Site Profile

Superfund Site:

MATTIACE PETROCHEMICAL CO., INC.
GLEN COVE, NY

Cleanup Activities

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Background

The Mattiace Petrochemical Co., Inc. site is located in Glen Cove, New York. The 2.5-acre area was a chemical distribution facility. From the mid-1960s until 1987, Mattiace received chemicals by tank truck and redistributed them to its customers. The company also operated the M&M Drum Cleaning Company on site until 1982. During this time, a Quonset hut, shed, concrete loading dock and about 56 storage tanks were located on site.

Mattiace began operating on site in the mid-1960s, receiving chemicals by tank truck and redistributing them to its customers. Primary operations included storing, blending and repackaging organic solvents. These solvents were stored in above ground and below ground tanks. They were blended and repackaged in 55-gallon drums under a covered section of the concrete loading dock in the northeast corner of the site. The 55-gallon drums were stacked and temporarily stored on the loading dock prior to shipment to various buyers.

The M&M Drum Cleaning Company used the metal Quonset hut on the western portion of the site to clean, pressure test and repaint drums. Mattiace Industries owned the M&M operation and the Mattiace operation. The resulting aqueous/solvent mixture was collected in a wet well in the southeast external corner of the Quonset hut. Liquids in the wet well were periodically discharged to one of the adjacent aboveground tanks or into a leaching pool on site.

An underground tank farm used for the storage of organic solvents was located in the northeast corner of the property. A total of 32 under ground and 24 above ground storage tanks were located there. The underground tanks were interconnected by a spill prevention system. Excess material from overfilled tanks drained through a series of four concrete manholes and discharged into the solvent/stormwater separator in the southeast corner of the site. This spill prevention system also acted as a stormwater collection system. Stormwater from the lower portion of the separator was intended to be drained by gravity and then pumped into the northwest leach pools. However, it has been reported that the liquids collected in the separator and ponded in the southeast corner of the property were often pumped through a hose down the Mattiace driveway while the facility was operational.

In 1987, Mattiace filed for bankruptcy and the facility closed. Also In 1987, after seven years of failed negotiations and litigation regarding various waste-handling and environmental infractions, the State of New York seized the site property. Following emergency actions to protect human health and the environment, and additional site investigations, EPA placed the site on the Superfund program’s National Priorities List in March 1989.

In 1988, EPA undertook an emergency action to secure the site and remove more than 100,000 gallons of hazardous liquids. Construction of the site’s long-term soil and groundwater remedy as described in the 1991 Record of Decision (ROD) was completed in 1998. The treatment system operated for approximately 16 years before a ROD Amendment was signed in September 2014 changing the remedy. Portions of the amended remedy have been completed, while otheres are currently in the design phase. Remedial action implementation of the vertical barrier wall was completed in the summer 2018. In-Situ Thermal Treatment began operations in November 2018 and is anticpated to be documented as complete in 2019. Remedial design investigations for the bioventing remedy began in the summer of 2019, with remedial action implementation anticipated to begin summer 2020.

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What Has Been Done to Clean Up the Site?

Emergency Actions: In 1988, EPA secured the site, collected samples and removed 100,000 gallons of flammable liquids, 20,000 gallons of contaminated water and 1,800 gallons of liquids containing polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). Lab packs were crushed and sent to an off-site incineration facility. Owners reclaimed cylinders and some empty tanks. All other hazardous materials were taken to approved off-site disposal facilities.
Soil and Groundwater: After a comprehensive remedial investigation and feasibility study (RI/FS) to determine the nature and extent of the contamination, and to evaluate remedial alternatives, EPA selected the remedy in the site’s June 1991 Record of Decision, or ROD. It included in-place vapor extraction of soil, limited excavation of soil contaminated with pesticides, removal of all tanks and cisterns, and groundwater pumping and treatment.

Buried Drums: After a geophysical survey during the RI, EPA found and characterized the contents of buried drums on the west-central part of the site. EPA signed a ROD in 1990 for the removal and off-site treatment and disposal of the drums and contaminated soil in the drum burial area. In the spring of 1992, EPA completed the excavation and off-site disposal of about 400 buried drums and contaminated soil.

Removal of all tanks, cisterns and associated piping was finished in the fall of 1996. The site’s integrated groundwater and soil vapor treatment facility started operating in the fall of 1998. Groundwater and soil vapor treatment system operated until 2014 when, following a supplemental RI/FS, an amended remedy was selected in a ROD Amendment.

Construction of the site’s groundwater pump and treat and SVE system was completed in 1998. In July 2003, a private company assumed the responsibility for long-term operation of the treatment facility under an agreement between EPA and the site’s potentially responsible parties (PRPs). EPA provides oversight of facility operations as part of the agreement. In 2012, the PRP Group initiated a supplemental RI/FS to further delineate the nature and extent of contamination at the site and to evaluate alternatives for remediating remaining contamination. A ROD Amendment was signed in September 2014, and the selected remedy is in the remedial design phase, with construction of the vertical barrier wall phase having been completed in the summer of 2017. The In-Situ thermal treatment system began operation in November 2018 and is anticipated to be documented as complete by the end of 2019. Remedial design investigations for the bioventing remedy began in the summer of 2019, with remedial action implementation anticipated to begin summer 2020.


 

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What Is the Current Site Status?

The site is being addressed in two stages: emergency actions and a long-term remedial phase focused on soil gas and groundwater cleanup.
EPA eliminated immediate threats to nearby residents and the environment by securing the Site and removing over 100,000 gallons of hazardous liquids during the removal action in 1989. Pursuant to two Records of Decision, EPA has excavated and disposed of pesticides-contaminated soil and buried drums, as well as above and below ground storage tanks, in addition to the demolition and removal of all Site structures. EPA substantially completed construction of the groundwater/soil vapor integrated treatment facility in August 1998 and, after a one year startup period, began long-term operation in September 1999. Following a supplemental remedial investigation and feasibility study conducted in 2012-2013, which delineated the horizontal and vertical extent of the groundwater plume on site and off site and the extent of light non-aqueous phase liquid (LNAPL) on site and off site, the groundwater pump and treat and soil vapor extraction system was shut down in 2014 when a ROD Amendment was signed selecting an alternative remedy for the site.

The amended remedy as described in the 2014 ROD Amendment is currently under design. The remedial components will be constructed in phases, beginning with a vertical hydraulic barrier and an in-situ thermal treatment system. By September of 2017, construction of the vertical hydraulic barrier wall was completed. The in-situ thermal treatment construction was completed in the fall of 2018 and the system began operations in November 2018 and was shut off in the Spring of 2019. Remedial design investigations for the bioventing remedy began in the summer of 2019, with remedial action implementation anticipated to begin summer 2020.

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