Superfund Information Systems: Site Profile

Superfund Site:

JONES SANITATION
HYDE PARK, NY

Cleanup Activities

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Background

The Jones Sanitation site is located in Dutchess County, New York. An industrial and septic waste disposal facility operated at the 57-acre area from 1956 to 1977. From the early 1960s through 1979, the landfill accepted industrial liquid wastes and sludges generated by Alfa-Laval, formerly known as the DeLaval Separator Co. of Poughkeepsie. These materials were oils and greases, acids, alkalis, solvents, metals from plating operations, pigments, phenols and volatile organic compounds (VOCs), including methylene chloride, chloroform and trichloroethylene (TCE). EPA has completed cleanup work and took the site off the Superfund program’s National priorities List. Long-term operation and maintenance activities are ongoing.

An industrial and septic waste disposal facility operated at the 57-acre area from 1956 to 1977. From the early 1960s through 1979, the landfill accepted industrial liquid wastes and sludges generated by Alfa-Laval, formerly known as the DeLaval Separator Co. of Poughkeepsie.

Following site investigations, EPA placed the site on the Superfund program’s National Priorities List in July 1987. After cleanup, EPA took the site off the National Priorities List in September 2005.

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What Has Been Done to Clean Up the Site?

EPA took over the management of the site response and investigations from the State of New York in 1990. Potentially responsible parties conducted a study to determine the extent of contamination from 1991 to mid-1995. EPA selected the remedy in the site’s March 1997 Record of Decision, or ROD. It included excavation of contaminated soils, consolidation of those soils into the central disposal area, construction of a cap over that area and groundwater monitoring. Construction of the remedy finished in September 2001. Institutional controls have been put in place. An Environmental Protection Easement and Declaration of Restrictive Covenants was filed with the Dutchess County Clerk on September 14, 2004.

Under the terms of the easement, the permanent cap area will not be developed for any use and groundwater under the cap will not be used in any way except for monitoring. Groundwater outside the cap area will not be withdrawn for any use without EPA’s prior approval.

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What Is the Current Site Status?

The site was addressed in a single long-term remedial phase focused on cleanup of the entire site.

Institutional controls have been put in place. An Environmental Protection Easement and Declaration of Restrictive Covenants was filed with the Dutchess County Clerk on September 14, 2004.
Under the terms of the easement, the permanent cap area will not be developed for any use and groundwater under the cap will not be used in any way except for monitoring. Groundwater outside the cap area will not be withdrawn for any use without EPA’s prior approval. Ongoing operation and maintenance activities include groundwater monitoring as well as gas monitoring and routine inspections to make sure the cap area is functioning as designed. Groundwater monitoring results indicate that the site does not affect the quality of off-site groundwater in either shallow overburden or the deeper bedrock aquifer near the site. EPA has completed cleanup work and took the site off the Superfund program’s National priorities List in September 2005.

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