Superfund Information Systems: Site Profile

Superfund Site:

CHARLES MACON LAGOON AND DRUM STORAGE
CORDOVA, NC

Cleanup Activities

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Background

The Charles Macon Lagoon and Drum Storage site is located in Cordova, North Carolina. It includes two separate, independently owned parcels of land: a 40-acre area owned by the Macon family and a 1-acre area owned by the Dockery family. The site, also known as the Macon Dockery site, includes the area where a waste oil recycling facility operated from 1979 to 1982. EPA placed the site on the Superfund program’s National Priorities List (NPL) in 1987 because of contaminated groundwater and soil resulting from facility operations. EPA, the North Carolina Department of Environmental Quality (NCDEQ), and two of the site’s potentially responsible parties (PRPs), the Clark Equipment Company and the Crown, Cork and Seal Company, have investigated site conditions and taken steps to clean up the site in order to protect people and the environment from contamination. Site contamination does not currently threaten people living and working near the site. By treating groundwater and undertaking Five-Year Reviews, EPA, NCDEQ and the PRPs continue to protect people and the environment from site contamination.

Soil contamination has been cleaned up. Groundwater contamination remains, but is confined to the site, and is being actively treated. Private wells are located upgradient (uphill) of the site. Local residents living and working near the site are not currently threatened by site contamination. EPA, NCDEQ and the site’s PRPs continue to make sure residents and the environment are protected from site contamination through ongoing groundwater treatment and required Five-Year Reviews.

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What Has Been Done to Clean Up the Site?

EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1987 because of contaminated ground water and soil resulting from facility operations. EPA, NCDEQ), and the site’s potentially responsible parties (PRPs), have investigated site conditions and taken steps to clean up the site in order to protect people and the environment from contamination. The site’s PRPs lead site cleanup activities, with oversight provided by EPA and NCDEQ. In 1983, EPA conducted short-term cleanup activities at the Macon property. EPA removed 3,123 tons of waste and 137,000 gallons of oil, including digging up and filling the unlined ponds with clean soil, with the exception of Lagoon 10. In 1984, EPA conducted removal activities at the Dockery property. EPA completed cleanup activities on both properties in 1984. In 1991, EPA issued a cleanup plan (a Record of Decision, or ROD) for the site. In 1994, EPA issued an amendment to the ROD to change the cleanup plan for Lagoon 10 to digging up and disposing of contaminated materials off site. The PRPs conducted cleanup activities at Lagoon 10 in 1994. The PRPs completed construction of the SVE and pump-and-treat systems in 1996. Following soil sampling, the PRPs decommissioned the SVE system in 2000. In 2009, EPA issued an Explanation of Significant Difference (ESD) to include institutional controls to restrict ground water use at the site. The site’s fourth Five-Year Review, completed in 2015, found that the cleanup remains protective of human health and the environment. Soil contamination has been cleaned up. Ground water contamination remains but is confined to the site and is being actively treated. Private wells are located upgradient (uphill) of the site. Local residents living and working near the site are not currently threatened by site contamination. The EPA, NCDEQ and the site’s PRPs continue to make sure residents and the environment are protected from site contamination through ongoing ground water treatment and required Five-Year Reviews.

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What Is the Current Site Status?

The most recent Five Year Review was published by EPA HQs in 2015. The remedies at the Charles Macon Lagoon and Drum Storage Site are currently protective of human health and the environment in the short-term because soil contamination was remediated through source removal and soil vapor extraction, and groundwater contamination is being remediated by extraction, treatment, and discharge to infiltration galleries.

The site’s long-term remedy, selected in 1991, included using a soil vapor extraction (SVE) treatment system to address contaminated soil in Lagoon 7; using living organisms to break down contaminants in Lagoon 10; constructing a groundwater treatment system; and dismantling, removing and disposing of site structures off-site. EPA updated the remedy in 1994 to change the remedy for Lagoon 10 to excavation and off-site disposal of contaminated materials. In 2009, EPA updated the remedy again to require institutional controls restricting groundwater use as part of the site’s long-term remedy.

Operation and maintenance activities as well as ground water treatment are ongoing. The EPA is working to implement institutional controls at the site. The EPA completed the last Five-Year Review in April 2015.

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Activity and Use Limitations

At this site, activity and use limitations that EPA calls institutional controls are in place. Institutional controls play an important role in site remedies because they reduce exposure to contamination by limiting land or resource use. They also guide human behavior. For instance, zoning restrictions prevent land uses – such as residential uses – that are not consistent with the level of cleanup.

For more background, see Institutional Controls.

EPA uses institutional controls to reduce exposure to contamination by restricting access to contaminated areas. Institutional controls can also guide human behavior through legal mechanisms such as deed restrictions and public health warning signs.

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Emergency Response and Removal

In 1983, the EPA conducted short-term cleanup activities at the Macon property. The EPA removed 3,123 tons of waste and 137,000 gallons of oil, including digging up and filling the unlined ponds with clean soil, with the exception of Lagoon 10. In 1984, the EPA conducted removal activities at the Dockery property. The EPA completed cleanup activities on both properties in 1984.

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Enforcement Information

The EPA negotiated legal agreements with the site’s PRPs to investigate and clean up the site. The PRPs paid for the site cleanup, and continue to fund monitoring and oversight activities.

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