Superfund Information Systems: Site Profile

Superfund Site:

WYCKOFF CO./EAGLE HARBOR
BAINBRIDGE ISLAND, WA

Cleanup Activities

On this page:


Background

EPA Completes Repair of Sediment Cap in Eagle Harbor 

Workers have repaired a portion of the sediment cap on the bottom of Eagle Harbor. The repair included a new sand layer, with a rock layer on top to prevent erosion. Part of the protective cap had eroded, exposing contaminated sediments that could be toxic to marine life. Construction wrapped up in late February. Please see the fact sheet for more information (PDF) (1 pp 224 KB).

Integrating Community Priorities and Cleanup Plans
A December 2016 White Paper reflects on the Site’s history, and describes community efforts to preserve Pritchard Park and land for the Bainbridge Island Japanese American Exclusion Memorial:

Site Background

The Wyckoff Eagle Harbor Superfund Site (Site) is on the east side of Bainbridge Island in Central Puget Sound, Washington. EPA added Eagle Harbor to the Superfund site list in 1987, when environmental investigations revealed extensive contamination in soils, groundwater, and in the sediment on the bottom of Eagle Harbor. EPA divided the site into cleanup areas:

  • Eagle Harbor sediment – About 100 acres of sediment on the bottom of Eagle Harbor became contaminated with creosote and other wood preserving chemicals released from the former Wyckoff wood treating facility. Also called the East Harbor Operable Unit (OU1).
  • Wyckoff wood treating facility soil and groundwater – located on the south side of Eagle Harbor, this area includes soil and groundwater that became contaminated during decades of wood treating operations. Also called the Soil and Groundwater Operable Units (OU2 and OU4).
  • West Harbor soil and sediment – the site of a former shipyard, this area became contaminated with mercury and other metals. Also called the West Harbor Operable Unit (OU-3).

Extensive cleanup actions have been completed in all three areas. The remedy in West Harbor is functioning as designed. No further work is needed at this time.

Additional cleanup actions are needed in the soil and groundwater at the former Wyckoff wood treating facility, and in the adjacent beach sediments. EPA released its Proposed Plan, which describes the agency’s preferred cleanup alternatives, in April 2016. The public comment period on the Proposed Plan closed June 30, 2016. After we carefully consider all of the public comments received, the EPA will issue a cleanup plan in late 2017

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What Is Being Done to Clean Up the Site?

In addition to ongoing maintenance and operations activities, EPA is planning additional construction activities:

  • Eagle Harbor Sediment. A 9-acre section of the original cap (installed in 1993 and 1994) had eroded, and was replaced in early 2017.
  • Eagle Harbor Sediment. In spring 2016, EPA proposed additional cleanup actions to address contamination remaining in the beaches adjacent to the former Wyckoff wood treating facility. EPA's preferred remedy includes excavation and capping. EPA’s proposed cleanup plan was released for public comment April - June 2016. EPA is now considering public comments, and will issue a final cleanup decision in late 2017.
  • Wyckoff wood treating facility soil and groundwater. EPA is proposing additional cleanup actions to address contamination remaining in the soil and groundwater. EPA’s preferred remedy includes a mix of technologies applied in two phases. The primary technology in Phase 1 would solidify the contamination in place by mixing wet cement into the soil. Contamination would also be extracted through additional groundwater wells, and air would be injected in the groundwater to help naturally occurring bacteria break down the contaminants. The EPA will monitor the groundwater after Phase I. Monitoring results will determine whether additional cleanup actions are needed in Phase 2. EPA’s proposed cleanup plan was released for public comment April-June 2016. EPA is now considering public comments, and will issue a final cleanup decision in late 2017

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What Is the Current Site Status?

Extensive cleanup work has been completed since Wyckoff/Eagle Harbor was added to the Superfund list in 1987.

  • Eagle Harbor Sediment. More than 70 acres of sediment in Eagle Harbor have been capped with a thick layer of clean sand. The cap prevents fish and other marine organisms from coming into contact with the contamination. Special rules for boaters are in place to prevent activities like anchoring,which could damage the cap.
  • Wyckoff wood treating facility soil and groundwater. Cleanup activities already completed include: demolishing buildings at the former Wyckoff wood treating facility, removing wood treating chemicals left in tanks and pipes, and hauling away contaminated soil and debris. EPA has also installed groundwater extraction wells, an onsite treatment plant, and a metal sheet pile wall around the upland area. Ecology operates the groundwater extraction and treatment system.
  • West Harbor soil and sediment – Cleanup activities at the former shipyard included studying and controlling upland sources of contamination. Sediments contaminated with mercury were excavated and disposed upland, and a clean sediment cap placed over areas of concern. The cleanup included building a nearshore confined disposal facility (CDF) in intertidal areas next to the former shipyard property. The CDF was built on lands owned by the Washington Department of Transportation (WSDOT) and now serves as a work area at the WSDOT ferry maintenance facility. The remedy is functioning as designed and no further cleanup work is planned. Regular inspections and monitoring are performed to ensure the remedy remains protective of people and the environment.

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EPA’s Involvement at the Site

EPA is the lead agency for the Wyckoff/Eagle Harbor Superfund site. The Washington Department of Ecology is an important partner. The two agencies have been coordinating closely over the last several years to investigate areas of remaining contamination and evaluate cleanup options. EPA will design and construct any additional remedial actions that are needed in Operable Units 1, 2, and 4. Ecology will pay 10 percent of the construction costs and assume responsibility for long term operations and maintenance after the cleanup construction is complete.

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Operable Units

During cleanup, a site can be divided into a number of distinct areas depending on its complexity. These areas, called operable units (OUs), may address geographic areas, specific problems, or areas where a specific action is required. Examples of typical operable units include construction of a groundwater pump and treatment system or construction of a cap over a landfill.

View a list of all of the operable units at this site.

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Cleanup Progress

View the schedule for cleaning up this site.

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