Superfund Information Systems: Site Profile

Superfund Site:

LOWER DUWAMISH WATERWAY
SEATTLE, WA

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Announcements and Key Topics

Calling all community members in the Duwamish Valley!

We have a few questions for you…

  1. Are you interested in participating in the Lower Duwamish Waterway Roundtable, which will meet on 3 weekdays per year for up to three hours each meeting to make recommendations to the US Environmental Protection Agency regarding the design of the cleanup of the Lower Duwamish Waterway? (Yes/No)
  2. If so, would you like to attend a training for community members for up to four hours on a weekend date this September? The training would provide background on the Superfund cleanup process, the waterway cleanup plan, and the design process to help prepare you for making recommendations to the US Environmental Protection Agency? (Yes/No)
  3. Which weekend days can you do?  (Saturday/Sunday/either one)

We will hold the first meeting of the Roundtable on Thursday afternoon, October 11th so if you are interested in being a member of the Duwamish Roundtable, it’s not too late!

If you chose “yes” to questions 1 and 2, please contact Julie Congdon, Community Involvement Coordinator for EPA (Congdon.Julie@epa.gov or 206.553.2752), with your response. She will be in touch with you regarding a date and location for this weekend training in September.

 

In the meantime, please click on the links below for more information about the Roundtable:

Feel free to reach out to Julie with any other questions or suggestions about the Roundtable.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Public Participation Opportunities

What can I do?

1. The best way to avoid being exposed to contamination in the river is to not eat the resident fish that have the contaminants in their body. It is safe to eat salmon that come to the river because they visit the river for such a short time.

2. Help keep pollutants from getting into the river. Don’t put oil and other pollutants into storm drains. Report spills by visiting http://www.ecy.wa.gov/programs/spills/other/reportaspill.htm or calling 1-800-424-8802.

3. Help restore habitat, plant trees, and cleanup up trash along the river at parks and on the shoreline by participating in Duwamish Alive and other volunteer events. For more information, please visit: http://www.duwamishalive.org

You can also become a member of the Lower Duwamish Waterway Roundtable, which will develop recommendations to the EPA in regards to the cleanup process. If you are interesting in serving as a representative to the Roundtable, please contact Julie Congdon for more information at congdon.julie@epa.gov or 206-553-2752.

 

Stay Informed and Involved

 

The Community Involvement Plan provides an overview on the engagement tools and techniques that we will use throughout the Superfund cleanup of the Lower Duwamish Waterway. Community Involvement Plan for the Lower Duwamish Waterway Superfund Site (PDF)

Elly Hale, Remedial Project Manager U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Region 10 206-553-1215 • hale.elly@epa.gov

Julie Congdon, Community Involvement Coordinator U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Region 10 206-553-2752 • congdon.julie@epa.gov

To receive regular updates on EPA’s cleanup work, please contact Julie Congdon (congdon.julie@epa.gov) to subscribe to the Duwamish cleanup listserv.

Follow us on Facebook to stay informed about our cleanup activities and our programs related to the Duwamish area: facebook.com/epaduwamish

For information on Washington Department of Ecology’s work in the Lower Duwamish Waterway, please visit: http://www.ecy.wa.gov/programs/tcp/sites_brochure/lower_duwamish/lower_duwamish_hp.html

To receive regular updates on Ecology’s cleanup work, you can subscribe to its email listserv for periodic updates on their source control and cleanup work in the Duwamish: http://listserv.wa.gov/cgi-bin/wa?SUBED1=DUWAMISH-RIVER-UPDATES&A=1

For information on the Community Advisory Group, please contact the Duwamish River Cleanup Coalition Technical Advisory Group (DRCC/TAG) at duwamishcleanup.org or contact@duwamishcleanup.org or 206-954-0218.

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Community Advisory Group

For information on the Community Advisory Group, please contact the Duwamish River Cleanup Coalition/Technical Advisory Group (DRCC/TAG) at
duwamishcleanup.orgcontact@duwamishcleanup.org ♦ 206-954-0218.

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Community Resources

The Community Involvement Plan provides an overview on the engagement tools and techniques that we will use throughout the Superfund cleanup of the Lower Duwamish Waterway. Community Involvement Plan for the Lower Duwamish Waterway Superfund Site: https://semspub.epa.gov/work/10/100033896.pdf

Funding for Your Project

The Urban Waters Small Grants are expanding the ability of communities to engage in activities that improve water quality in a way that also advances community priorities. Improving urban waters requires various levels of government and local stakeholders (e.g., community residents, local businesses, etc.) to work together in developing effective and long-term solutions with multiple benefits. EPA supports and empowers communities, especially in under-served areas, who are working on solutions to address multiple community needs and fostering successful collaborative partnerships. Since the inception of the Urban Waters Small Grants Program in 2012, the program has awarded approximately $6.6 million in grants to 114 organizations across the country and Puerto Rico. Local community-based organizations can apply for funding up to $60,000.

The Environmental Justice Small Grants Program supports and empowers communities working on solutions to local environmental and public health issues. The program is designed to help communities understand and address exposure to multiple environmental harms and risks. Environmental Justice Small Grants fund projects up to $30,000, depending on the availability of funds in a given year. All projects are associated with at least one qualified environmental statute. Since its inception in 1994, the Environmental Justice Small Grants Program has awarded more than $24 million in funding to over 1400 community-based organizations, and local and tribal organizations working with communities facing environmental justice issues. Community groups can apply for funding up to $30,000.

Annual Environmental Workforce Development and Job Training grants allow nonprofit and other organizations to recruit, train, and place predominantly low-income, minority, unemployed, and under-employed people living in areas affected by solid and hazardous waste. Residents learn the skills needed to secure full-time, sustainable employment in the environmental field, including assessment and cleanup. These green jobs reduce environmental contamination and build more sustainable futures for communities. Non-profit organizations and local governments can apply for funding from this grant program

Environmental Justice Collaborative Problem-Solving Grant Program (CPS) provides financial assistance to eligible organizations working on or planning to work on projects to address local environmental and/or public health issues in their communities, using EPA's "Environmental Justice Collaborative Problem-Solving Model." The CPS Program assists recipients in building collaborative partnerships to help them understand and address environmental and public health concerns in their communities. Local community-based organizations can apply for $120,000 in assistance.

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