Superfund Information Systems: Site Profile

Superfund Site:

LIBERTY INDUSTRIAL FINISHING
FARMINGDALE, NY

Cleanup Activities

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Background

The Liberty Industrial Finishing site is located in Oyster Bay, New York. During World War II and the Korean War, industrial operations at the 30-acre site included aircraft parts manufacturing and associated metal finishing processes largely in support of military efforts. After the wars, the site was used for other industrial and warehousing operations. During these operations, wastes were discharged into below-grade sumps, underground leaching chambers and unlined groundwater recharge basins or lagoons. These operations contaminated soil and groundwater with hazardous chemicals. Following immediate actions to protect human health and the environment, the site’s long-term remedy was put in place. Long-term groundwater treatment is ongoing.

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What Has Been Done to Clean Up the Site?

Immediate Actions: In 1978 and 1987, contaminated soil and sludge were removed from industrial waste disposal basins. In 1994, polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB)-contaminated soils were removed, eliminating current human health risks posed by the site. In 1998, EPA selected an interim groundwater remedy. Its goal was to prevent contaminated groundwater from migrating off site until the site-wide soil and groundwater remedy could be put in place. Since June 2004, the site’s groundwater pump-and-treat system has been operating at full capacity. It effectively treats both organic and inorganic contamination. In late 1999, about 1.5 million pounds of PCB-contaminated shredded auto-fluff that had been stored on site was removed.

A contaminated mound of soil on the western portion of the site and underground features on a 10-acre portion of the site were addressed. These features included sumps, vaults, drains, pipes, underground leaching chambers, underground storage tanks and a sanitary leaching field. The soil mound was removed in March 2003. Work to address the underground features began in July 2004 and finished in December 2008.

Long-term Cleanup: Following remedial investigations and feasibility studies to determine the nature and extent of site contamination and to evaluate remedial alternatives, EPA selected the remedy in the site’s March 2002 Record of Decision, or ROD. It included excavation and off-site disposal of 73,100 cubic yards of contaminated soils, construction and operation of a conventional pump-and-treat system to address groundwater, and excavation and off-site disposal of 2,600 cubic yards of contaminated pond sediments at the Massapequa Preserve. Pond sediment cleanup took place in March 2009. Soil cleanup took place in September 2011. The groundwater pump-and-treat system began operating in September 2010.

The New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (NYSDEC) has listed the Farmingdale Dry Cleaner site on its Registry of Inactive Hazardous Waste Disposal Sites. The NYSDEC site is about a half-mile north of the Liberty Industrial Finishing site. It is a suspected source of Plume B, which is affecting the site. As part of the response action at the Farmingdale Plaza Cleaners site, NYSDEC has also put in a soil vapor extraction (SVE) treatment system to address the source of Plume B. Operation of the SVE system, put in place in November 2011, is ongoing. The SVE system is anticipated to remediate any residual soil contamination that could otherwise continue to contribute to Plume B groundwater contamination.  NYSDEC has also completed a remedial investigation and feasibility study of the Farmingdale Dry Cleaner site focusing on Plume B. . In March 2014, NYSDEC issued OU 2 ROD selecting Plume B remedy.

NYSDEC’s remedial design of the off-property Plume B pump-and-treat system is scheduled for completion in the summer of 2017 and a Request for Proposal is expected to be issued by the end of 2017 which will be followed by construction of the treatment system.

In February and March 2006, EPA conducted a Phase I vapor intrusion investigation, which involved the collection of air samples at 15 homes near the Site and at the Woodward Parkway Elementary School in Farmingdale, New York. The goal was to determine if vapors associated with groundwater contamination at the site were entering those properties. In April 2006, EPA conducted follow-up sampling of indoor air at two of the homes and at the school. The sampling results did not show any vapor intrusion impact and, therefore, did not indicate any potential impact on the health of the occupants. From 2006 to 2010, EPA continued to conduct vapor sampling at the Woodward Parkway Elementary School and several homes, and the sampling results during this period also did not show any vapor intrusion impacts. Based on these results, from 2010 to 2014, EPA continued to conduct vapor sampling only at the Woodward Parkway elementary school; the sampling results during this period also did not show any vapor intrusion impact as they were below screening levels in sub-slab soils and indoor air.  It was determined that one more sampling event would occur at the school during the 2016-2017 heating season. This vapor sampling event was conducted in January 2017 and the results confirm that indoor air and sub-slab air sampling results remain below screening levels. Upon review of all vapor sampling results to date, EPA has determined that soil vapor intrusion investigation is no longer warranted at the Site.

In July 2001, the Town of Oyster Bay announced its intention to acquire a 15-acre portion of the former industrial facility for expansion of the adjacent Ellsworth Allen Park for community recreation. In June 2003, EPA entered into a prospective purchaser agreement with the town that released the locality from Superfund liability and discharged existing and prospective Superfund liens against the parkland in exchange for a substantial payment from the town to EPA that may be used for, among other things, cleanup or reimbursement of EPA costs at the site. In September 2003, the Town of Oyster Bay acquired a 15-acre portion of the site. Following cleanup, the town will put in recreational facilities and establish a new community park.

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What Is the Current Site Status?

The site is being addressed in two stages: immediate actions and a long-term remedial phase focused on cleanup of the entire site.

Cleanup of the underground features at the ten-acre portion of the Liberty site, required by March 2002 EPA Order, began in July of 2004 and was completed in December 2008. All components of the primary cleanup have been completed by the responsible parties.

Upon completion of design work for the soil cleanup in August 2006, soils cleanup commenced and was completed in September 2011. Upon completion of design work for the pond sediment cleanup in September 2007, pond sediment cleanup work commenced and was completed in March 2009. The groundwater cleanup design activities were completed in September 2008. The subsequent groundwater cleanup commenced in March 2009 and all associated construction activities were completed and the pump and treat system deemed to be fully operational & functional in September 2010.

As part of the response action at the Farmingdale Dry Cleaner site, NYSDEC has implemented a soil vapor extraction (SVE) treatment system as an Interim Action to address the source of Plume B. The SVE construction commenced in June 2011 and was completed in November 2011. It is currently operating. The SVE system is anticipated to remediate any residual soil contamination that could otherwise continue to contribute to Plume B groundwater contamination.

Long-term groundwater treatment is ongoing.

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