Superfund Information Systems: Site Profile

Superfund Site:

SMS INSTRUMENTS, INC.
DEER PARK, NY

Cleanup Activities

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Background

The SMS Instruments site is located in Suffolk County, New York. The site is the location of an active commercial facility that includes a 34,000-square-foot building on a 1.5-acre lot. Formerly, the site was an active industrial facility whose operations included the overhauling of military aircraft components. Overhauling operations included cleaning, painting, degreasing, refurbishing, metal machining and testing. Facility operations contaminated groundwater and soil with hazardous chemicals.

 

SMS Instruments started operations on the site started in early 1967 when Mr. Sol Schusheim rented the property from Marcus Associates of Farmingdale, New York. The site property at 120 Marcus Boulevard in Deer Park was sold to Ogden Technology in April 1967 and in September 1973, Mr. Schusheim purchased the site property from Ogden Technology. The SMS Instruments facility ceased operations in the 1980s.

The industrial operations performed at the site generated wastewaters that were discharged into a leaching pool adjacent to the building.  Three sources of groundwater and soil contamination were found at the site. The first major source was a leaching pool on the south side of the building where industrial waste generated from degreasing and other metal refurbishing operations were routinely discharged The leaching pool was pumped out, filled with sand and sealed in 1983. The second major source was a 6,000-gallon underground storage tank (UST) used for storage of jet fuel until 1981. SMS Instruments removed the UST in February 1988, during the remedial investigation. Another source of surface soil contamination was documented from spillage and from leaking waste drums stored in the back lot of the site property, east of the building. After immediate actions to protect human health and the environment, and site investigations, EPA placed the site on the Superfund program’s National Priorities List in June 1986.

Following the immediate actions, EPA put the site’s long-term remedy in place. After completing the remedy, EPA took the site off the Superfund program’s National Priorities List in September 2010.

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What Has Been Done to Clean Up the Site?

Immediate Actions: The leaching pool was pumped out, filled with sand and sealed in 1983. The underground jet fuel storage tank was removed in 1988.  Waste drums were removed from the site for offsite disposal.

Long-term Cleanup: EPA selected a remedy for contaminated groundwater and soils in the site’s September 1989 Record of Decision, or ROD. The ROD called for extracting and treating (through air stripping) groundwater and reinjecting the treated water back into the aquifer. This plan was later revised to allow for treated groundwater to be discharged directly into the recharge basin next to the site. Soils were to be treated on site using in-place soil vapor extraction (SVE). The SVE unit operated from April 1992 to November 1993, when all soil cleanup goals were achieved. The soil treatment unit was dismantled and removed.

Construction of the groundwater treatment plant finished in June 1994. The system, which operated from June 1994 to September 2005, adequately treated contaminated groundwater such that the effluent contaminant concentrations were consistently below required discharge levels. In May 2005, EPA installed an air sparging system to remediate residual contamination in soil above and below the water table. As a result, contaminant levels decreased and the New York Department of Environmental Conservation (NYSDEC), which took over all responsibilities at the site in July 2005, turned off the groundwater treatment system. The groundwater treatment system was later dismantled and removed from the site. Operation of the air sparging system stopped temporarily for about six months in 2007. The system was then turned back on and operated through the end of 2009.

Off-site Contamination: In May 1990, EPA began an investigation to determine the nature and extent of groundwater contamination upgradient of the site. The field work finished in December 1992. The study indicated that there were no upgradient off-site sources that affected the contamination at the site.
 

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What Is the Current Site Status?

The site has been addressed in three stages: immediate actions and two long-term remedial phases focused on cleanup of the entire site. In addition, an investigation of off-site groundwater contamination and potential upgradient sources of contamination also took place.

Site cleanup included: removal of the waste drums from the site, pumping out the leaching pool, operation of a soil vapor extraction system, groundwater extraction and treatment, and operation of an airsparging system to remediate residual contamination in soil above and below the water table.

Remediation of the site has been completed. EPA took the site off the Superfund program’s National Priorities List in September 2010.


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