Superfund Information Systems: Site Profile

Superfund Site:

LAWRENCE AVIATION INDUSTRIES, INC.
PORT JEFFERSON STATION, NY

Cleanup Activities

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Background

The Lawrence Aviation Industries, Inc. (LAI) site is located in Port Jefferson Station, New York. The 126-acre area includes LAI's manufacturing plant, which historically produced titanium sheeting for the aeronautics industry. The LAI facility consists of 10 buildings in the southwestern portion of the property. An abandoned, unlined earthen lagoon that formerly received liquid wastes is west of the buildings. A former drum crushing area is south of the buildings. About 80 acres northeast and east of the LAI facility are referred to as the "Outlying Parcels." They are vacant, wooded areas. Finally, the site also includes a downgradient contaminated groundwater plume. Currently, the LAI facility is not operating, many buildings are vacant, and unused. Past disposal practices resulted in a variety of contaminant releases, including trichloroethene (TCE), tetrachloroethene (PCE), acid wastes, oils, sludge, metals and other plant wastes.

The site property was previously part of a turkey farm owned by LAI's corporate predecessor, Ledkote Products Company of New York. Since 1959, the 42-acre LAI facility had manufactured products from titanium sheet metal, including golf clubs and products for the aeronautics industry. Past disposal practices have resulted in a variety of contaminant releases, including TCE, PCE, acid wastes, oils, sludge, metals and other plant wastes.

In an effort to "clean up" its facility in 1980, LAI reportedly crushed more than 1,600 drums, allowing their liquid contents to spill onto unprotected soil. Previous investigations suggest that releases of hazardous substances from the facility have affected site soils, groundwater, surface water and sediment downgradient of the Site. During the 1970s and 1980s, Suffolk County’s Department of Health Services (SCDHS) and the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (NYSDEC) conducted several investigations and documented various potential environmental concerns.

After short-term cleanups to protect human health and the environment, and additional investigations, EPA placed the site on the Superfund program’s National Priorities List in February 2000.  

Following short-term cleanups to protect human health and the environment, the site’s long-term remedy is now in place. Groundwater treatment is ongoing.

 

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What Has Been Done to Clean Up the Site?

Groundwater Removal Actions: Sampling detected TCE in 11 residential wells north of the site. In 1987, EPA connected these residences to the public water supply to eliminate the presence or threat of exposure to TCE contamination.

Drum Removal Action: More than 2,000 drums containing acetone, acids, oils, salty bases, inks and untreated acidic sludges, as well as numerous types of solid waste, were removed in 1990 and 1991. In 2004, EPA stabilized remaining on-site materials. About 1,300 drums of waste materials were disposed of off-site at an approved disposal facility.

Asbestos-containing material removal action: This action began in December 2014 to abate and dispose of asbestos-containing material and mercury released to the environment in Building G. This removal action was completed in February - March 2015.

Long-term Cleanup: Following a remedial investigation and feasibility study to determine the nature and extent of site contamination and to evaluate remedial alternatives, EPA selected the remedy in the site’s September 2006 Record of Decision, or ROD. It included excavation and removal of surface soils with polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) concentrations exceeding 1 part per million. The selected remedy for groundwater included groundwater extraction and treatment as well as in-place chemical oxidation enhancement.

Excavation and off-site disposal of PCB soils in the former Drum Crushing area began in February 2009, and finished in November 2009. About 16,000 tons of contaminated soil were dug up and disposed of off-site at an approved disposal facility.

 

 

 

 

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What Is the Current Site Status?

The site will be addressed in three stages: short-term removal action cleanups and long-term remedial phases focused on soil and groundwater contamination at the site, and groundwater contamination migrating off site.

The extension of public water to the 11 nearby residences has eliminated the potential exposure or threat of exposure to contamination through the drinking water pathway. Additionally, the removal of drums containing hazardous chemicals has reduced the number of source areas on the property and the potential for further contamination of the underlying groundwater.

Excavation and off-site disposal of PCB soils in the former Drum Crushing area began in February 2009 and was completed in November 2009.

The groundwater treatment systems at the LAI facility and downgradient at the Old Mill Pond location are now in place and continue to operate.

 

 

 

 

 

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