Superfund Information Systems: Site Profile

Superfund Site:

STATE MARINE OF PORT ARTHUR
JEFFERSON COUNTY, TX

Cleanup Activities

On this page:

On related pages:


Background

Current Status

The EPA issued a “No Further Action is Necessary” Record of Decision in April 2007.  This decision was based on a Removal Action, which addressed the materials that posed a risk to human and ecological receptors, and the Human Health and Ecological Risk Assessments, that determined there was no risk to human health and the environment.  Institutional controls (i.e., deed restrictions) are in place and have been recorded at the local county offices to ensure that the Site’s use remains industrial/commercial.

The EPA proposed to delete the Site from the National Priorities List (NPL).  A “Notice of Intent to Delete” and a “Direct Final Notice of Deletion” were published in the Federal Register (FR) on December 6, 2011.  The deletion became effective on February 6, 2012.  Deletion of the Site from the NPL does not preclude further response actions under Superfund.

Site Background

The 17-acre State Marine of Port Arthur site is located in Port Arthur, Texas. The site is the former location of a barge-cleaning operation and a municipal landfill. Site activities contaminated soils, sediments and groundwater with hazardous chemicals. Following cleanup, EPA took the site off the Superfund program’s National Priorities List (NPL) in 2012.

National Priorities Listing History
Proposal Date: March 06, 1998
Final Listing Date: July 28, 1998
Population: Approximately 61,000 people live in the City of Port Arthur.
Setting: The owner is currently using the Site as an industrial property and land use surrounding the Site is industrial.

Top of Page


What Has Been Done to Clean Up the Site?

The site was addressed through federal, state and potentially responsible party (PRP) actions.

 

Around 1963, the City of Port Arthur began municipal landfill operations in the northern and central portions of the islet. Initially, the landfill consisted of a burn pit where the city incinerated wastes. By December 1969, the city had discontinued burn operations and used the landfill solely for disposal of wastes. Between 1969 and 1972, landfill disposal operations expanded to include the central and northern portions of the site and the property north of the site. In December 1974, the City of Port Arthur closed the landfill in accordance with Texas Department of Health regulations, which required covering the entire landfill with about two feet of fine-grained fill material. EPA believes the cover material consists of dredge spoils that originated on the islet.

Site operations began around 1973. The impoundments reportedly consisted of unlined earthen dike areas about 2 acres in size used to store oil and wastewater from barge-cleaning operations. Inspection reports indicate that wastewater from the barge-cleaning operations was directed to two aboveground storage tanks and then pumped to the wastewater impoundments. Some of the oil from the tanks diverted to an old ship docked on the land which the company used as an oil/water separator. The company collected oil from the separator for reuse, potentially on the site. An anonymous caller alerted the Texas Department of Water Resources (TWDR), predecessor of the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ), to contamination on the site in 1983.

Around 1963, the City of Port Arthur began municipal landfill operations in the northern and central portions of the islet. Initially, the landfill consisted of a burn pit where the city incinerated wastes. By December 1969, the city had discontinued burn operations and used the landfill solely for disposal of wastes. Between 1969 and 1972, landfill disposal operations expanded to include the central and northern portions of the site and the property north of the site. In December 1974, the City of Port Arthur closed the landfill in accordance with Texas Department of Health regulations, which required covering the entire landfill with about two feet of fine-grained fill material. EPA believes the cover material consists of dredge spoils that originated on the islet.

Site operations began around 1973. The impoundments reportedly consisted of unlined earthen dike areas about 2 acres in size used to store oil and wastewater from barge-cleaning operations. Inspection reports indicate that wastewater from the barge-cleaning operations was directed to two aboveground storage tanks and then pumped to the wastewater impoundments. Some of the oil from the tanks diverted to an old ship docked on the land which the company used as an oil/water separator. The company collected oil from the separator for reuse, potentially on the site. An anonymous caller alerted the Texas Department of Water Resources (TWDR), predecessor of the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ), to contamination on the site in 1983.

Top of Page


What Is the Current Site Status?

Site cleanup consisted of a removal action, or short-term cleanup, to address immediate threats to human health and the environment. The removal action in 2001 removed and disposed of aboveground storage tanks, oil pits, drums and debris materials. Removal activities also included water treatment, oil/water separation, and stabilization and off-site disposal of sludge materials.

Following the removal action, EPA selected “no further action” as the final remedy because site conditions did not present a significant threat to human and environmental health. Institutional controls to restrict site land uses to industrial and commercial uses have been in effect since 2011. Following cleanup, EPA took the site off the NPL in 2012.

Top of Page