Superfund Information Systems: Site Profile

Superfund Site:

CITY OF PERRYTON WELL NO. 2
PERRYTON, TX

Cleanup Activities

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Background

The City of Perryton Well No. 2 site is located in Perryton, Texas. Well No. 2 at the site is located on a 1.7-acre maintenance yard used by the Perryton Utility Department. Well No. 2 served as a public drinking water supply well until 1989 when the Texas Department of Health identified contamination in the well and took it out of service. Following cleanup activities, groundwater monitoring is ongoing.

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What Has Been Done to Clean Up the Site?

The site is being addressed through federal and state actions. EPA has conducted several five-year reviews of the site’s remedy. These reviews ensure that the remedies put in place protect public health and the environment, and function as intended by site decision documents. The most recent review concluded that response actions at the site are in accordance with the remedy selected by EPA and that the remedy continues to be protective of human health and the environment.

The pump-and-treat system has cleaned up the main production zone of the Ogallala aquifer. Successful abandonment of Well No. 2 will allow unrestricted use of the lower flow zone aquifer, the source of drinking water for Perryton.

About 7,758 people live in Perryton. The Ogallala aquifer is the principal source of drinking water for the community. The public water supply system consists of 11 or more wells in the Ogallala aquifer. Within the site, the Ogallala aquifer has been divided into upper and lower flow zones. The principal production zone for the City of Perryton is the lower flow zone. The upper flow zone produces a minimal amount of water and is isolated from the lower zone.About 7,758 people live in Perryton. The Ogallala aquifer is the principal source of drinking water for the community. The public water supply system consists of 11 or more wells in the Ogallala aquifer. Within the site, the Ogallala aquifer has been divided into upper and lower flow zones. The principal production zone for the City of Perryton is the lower flow zone. The upper flow zone produces a minimal amount of water and is isolated from the lower zone.

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What Is the Current Site Status?

The long-term remedy for the site included pumping of groundwater, treatment using an air stripper treatment plant and installation of two additional extraction wells next to Well No. 2. Construction of the remedy took place in 2006 and 2007. Sampling results from 2007 confirmed that groundwater in the lower flow zone had been cleaned up. The pump-and-treat system shut down to allow for evaluation of potential contaminant rebound in the extraction wells. Sampling events took place in 2007 and 2008.

In coordination with the City of Perryton, EPA developed plans for abandonment of Well No. 2. EPA completed plugging and abandonment of Well No. 2 in 2011. Sampling in 2011 did not detect any changes in contaminant concentrations since the 2007 and 2008 sampling events. The treatment plant and remaining extraction well shut down in 2011 when the city completed a water supply line to the northern distribution system. EPA prepared a Technical Impracticability (TI) waiver. EPA updated the long-term remedy to include the TI waiver and require institutional controls for the properties above the remaining groundwater contamination.

EPA installed nine additional groundwater monitoring wells in 2014. Groundwater monitoring is ongoing. The groundwater pump-and-treat system remains shut down but may be restarted if necessary.

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Activity and Use Limitations

At this site, activity and use limitations that EPA calls institutional controls are in place. Institutional controls play an important role in site remedies because they reduce exposure to contamination by limiting land or resource use. They also guide human behavior. For instance, zoning restrictions prevent land uses – such as residential uses – that are not consistent with the level of cleanup.

For more background, see Institutional Controls.

State contact (TCEQ): Scott Settemeyer, 512-239-3429, Scott.Settemeyer@tceq.texas.gov

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