Superfund Information Systems: Site Profile

Superfund Site:

LORENTZ BARREL & DRUM CO.
SAN JOSE, CA

Cleanup Activities

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Background

The Lorentz Barrel & Drum Co. site is located at the intersection of Alma Avenue and 10th Street in San Jose, California. A waste drum reconditioning and recycling facility operated on site from 1947 to 1987. Facility operations contaminated soil and groundwater with hazardous chemicals. Most of the site’s cleanup has been completed. Site investigations and cleanup planning for a remaining source area of contamination are ongoing.

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What Has Been Done to Clean Up the Site?

The site is being addressed through federal, state and potentially responsible party (PRP) actions.

EPA has prevented or limited human exposure at the site through the capping of the contaminated soil and the containment transect of extraction wells. With the completion of the FFS, EPA will have selected a remedy for remaining contamination on site. When this remedial action is completed, the site should be fully remediated and ready for closeout.

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What Is the Current Site Status?

To date, EPA has prevented or limited human exposure at the site through the capping of the contaminated soil and the containment transect of extraction wells. Most of the cleanup at the site has been completed. There is a small amount of contamination remaining in the clay aquitard that is back diffusing and contaminating the groundwater. After this source area is remediated, it may take some time to treat the existing groundwater plume. When this remedial action is completed, the site should be fully remediated and ready for closeout.

To address this source area, a Focused Feasibility Study (FFS) started in September 2011. This is a collaborative effort between EPA and the Lorentz Shallow Groundwater Task Force (LSGTF), whose members are potentially responsible parties (PRPs). The purpose of the FFS is to evaluate existing soil and groundwater remedies and other remedial options to determine the best technical approach to effectively and efficiently achieve all cleanup goals within a reasonable restoration period.

FFS data collection has consisted of soil and groundwater sampling to close existing data gaps, groundwater sampling to determine the extent of the groundwater plume, and soil gas sampling as part of an investigation of potential for vapor intrusion. This information, along with data from a tracer dilution test, is being used to develop a model of the groundwater flow underlying the site. In turn, this model will be used to generate a soil cleanup level that will be protective of groundwater.

When the FFS is completed, likely in December 2015, new soil and groundwater remedies will be selected. The next steps will then be to design and implement the remedies. These two steps have a tentative completion date of 2018.

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Activity and Use Limitations

At this site, activity and use limitations that EPA calls institutional controls are in place. Institutional controls play an important role in site remedies because they reduce exposure to contamination by limiting land or resource use. They also guide human behavior. For instance, zoning restrictions prevent land uses – such as residential uses – that are not consistent with the level of cleanup.

For more background, see Institutional Controls.

1,1-Dicholoroethane,1,2-Dicholoroethane, 1,1-Dichloroethylene, cis-1,2-Dichloroethylene, Trans-1,2-Dichloroethylene, Perchloroethylene, 1,1,1-Trichloroethane, Trichloroethylene, Vinyl Chloride, 1,4-Dioxane

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