Superfund Information Systems: Site Profile

Superfund Site:

ONONDAGA LAKE
SYRACUSE, NY

Redevelopment

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About the Superfund Redevelopment Initiative

This nationally coordinated effort provides EPA and its partners with a process to return Superfund sites to productive use. Learn more at Superfund Redevelopment Initiative.

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Redevelopment at the Site

The eastern shore of Onondaga Lake is mainly urban and residential, and the northern shore is dominated by parkland, wooded areas, and wetlands. The northwest upland is primarily residential, with interspersed urban structures and several undeveloped areas. The southern and western shorelines are dominated by industrial waste beds, consisting mainly of ionic wastes, many of which have been revegetated. Urban centers and industrial zones dominate the landscape surrounding the south end of Onondaga Lake from approximately the New York State Fairgrounds to Ley Creek. Land around the southwest corner and southern portion of the lake is generally industrial and has been significantly modified as part of long-term development of the Syracuse area. Land around much of the lake is recreational, providing hiking and biking trails, picnicking, sports, and other recreational activities.
In early 2014, Onondaga County announced plans to construct an amphitheater complex near Lakeview Point as part of a community revitalization effort that is supported by New York State. The Onondaga County Lakeview Amphitheater and Community Revitalization Project commenced in March 2015 and was completed in late summer 2015. The Onondaga Nation is seeking to reestablish traditional uses on and around the lake, including hunting, fishing, gathering medicinal and food plants and engaging in ceremonial uses of the area.

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Economic Activity at the Site

As of December 2016, EPA had data on 11 on-site businesses. These businesses employed 202 people and generated an estimated $54,361,400 in annual sales revenue. View additional information about redevelopment economics at Superfund sites.

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