Superfund Information Systems: Site Profile

Superfund Site:

NORTH BELMONT PCE
NORTH BELMONT, NC

Redevelopment

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About the Superfund Redevelopment Initiative

This nationally coordinated effort provides EPA and its partners with a process to return Superfund sites to productive use. Learn more at Superfund Redevelopment Initiative.

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Redevelopment at the Site

The North Belmont PCE Superfund site consists of two closed dry cleaning businesses in North Belmont, North Carolina. The main source of contamination is located where a dry cleaning establishment operated from 1960 to 1975. A second dry cleaning business operated prior to 1960 at the other source area. Improper disposal of waste dry cleaning solvents resulted in soil and groundwater contamination. In 1991, Gaston County Health Department sampling efforts found significant PCE contamination in a residential well. This well supplied drinking water to an elementary school and two homes. Further investigation found contamination in 16 residential drinking water wells. In 1999, EPA added the site to the Superfund program’s National Priorities List (NPL). Cleanup activities at the site included on-site groundwater treatment, connection of affected residences and businesses to a public water supply, optional wellhead treatment for affected private wells and continued groundwater monitoring. Residential properties and a few small businesses are located at the second source area.

The North Belmont PCE site is in continued use. Commercial businesses and residential properties are located on site.

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Economic Activity at the Site

As of December 2017, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. View information about redevelopment economics at Superfund sites.

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Activity and Use Limitations

At this site, activity and use limitations that EPA calls institutional controls are in place. Institutional controls play an important role in site remedies because they reduce exposure to contamination by limiting land or resource use. They also guide human behavior. For instance, zoning restrictions prevent land uses – such as residential uses – that are not consistent with the level of cleanup. For more background, see Institutional Controls.

EPA uses institutional controls to reduce exposure to contamination by restricting access to contaminated areas. Institutional controls can also guide human behavior through legal mechanisms such as deed restrictions and public health warning signs.

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