Superfund Information Systems: Site Profile

Superfund Site:

WASHINGTON COUNTY LANDFILL
LAKE ELMO, MN

Redevelopment

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About the Superfund Redevelopment Initiative

This nationally coordinated effort provides EPA and its partners with a process to return Superfund sites to productive use. Learn more at Superfund Redevelopment Initiative.

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Redevelopment at the Site

The 25-acre Washington County Landfill Superfund site is located in the City of Lake Elmo, Minnesota.  The landfill accepted a variety of residential, commercial, industrial and demolition wastes between 1969 and 1975. Over time, waste disposal at the unlined landfill resulted in contamination of site soil and surrounding groundwater. EPA added the site to the Superfund program’s National Priorities List (NPL) in 1984. The Minnesota Pollution Control Agency (MPCA) cleaned up the site under its Closed Landfill Program. Early cleanup actions included groundwater extraction and treatment and providing safe drinking water for affected residences. From 2010 to 2012, MPCA excavated all landfill waste and placed it into a newly constructed triple-lined landfill on site with leachate and gas control systems. Currently, MPCA maintains the landfill. In a 2014 Closed Landfill Use Plan, MPCA identified several potential uses for the cleaned site. In 2015, MPCA constructed a solar energy system on the landfill to supply energy for ongoing operation of the leachate and gas collection systems.

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Economic Activity at the Site

As of December 2018, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. View information about redevelopment economics at Superfund sites.

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Activity and Use Limitations

At this site, activity and use limitations that EPA calls institutional controls are in place. Institutional controls play an important role in site remedies because they reduce exposure to contamination by limiting land or resource use. They also guide human behavior. For instance, zoning restrictions prevent land uses – such as residential uses – that are not consistent with the level of cleanup. For more background, see Institutional Controls.

At this site, activity and use limitations that EPA calls institutional controls are in place. Institutional controls play an important role in site remedies because they reduce exposure to contamination by limiting land or resource use. They also guide human behavior. For instance, zoning restrictions prevent land uses – such as residential uses – that are not consistent with the level of cleanup.

For more background, see Institutional Controls.

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