Superfund Information Systems: Site Profile

Superfund Site:

GALLAWAY PITS
GALLAWAY, TN


Site Details



On this page:

Site Background

The 10-acre Gallaway Pits site is located in Gallaway, Tennessee. It includes the area where disposal of municipal and industrial wastes took place beginning in the 1970s. EPA placed the site on the Superfund program’s National Priorities List (NPL) in 1983 because of contaminated sediment, soil and surface water resulting from waste disposal practices. EPA and the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) have investigated site conditions and taken steps to clean up the site in order to protect people and the environment from contamination. Site contamination does not currently threaten people living and working near the site. By cleaning up the site and undertaking Five-Year Reviews, EPA and TDEC continue to protect people and the environment from site contamination. After cleanup, EPA took the site off the NPL in 1996.

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Stay Informed and Involved

The EPA conducted a range of community involvement activities to solicit community input and to make sure the public remains informed about site activities throughout the cleanup process. Outreach efforts included public notices, interviews, fact sheets and public meetings. Site Repository: Gallaway City Hall P. O. Box 168 Gallaway, TN 38936

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EPA’s Involvement at this Site

The 10-acre site is located in Gallaway in Fayette County, Tennessee. The site includes grass-covered areas and several ponds. Forested areas and agricultural land uses border the site. Residences are located north and east of the site. The closest home is located 1,600 feet west of the site. Beginning in the 1970s, unauthorized disposal of municipal and industrial wastes occurred at the site. Disposal activities placed wastes, including pesticides, residential and industrial solid waste, trash; and debris at the site. Activities also drained drums containing liquid wastes or disposed of drums in water-filled ponds on site. In 1983, the EPA listed the site on the NPL. Following the completion of cleanup activities, the EPA deleted the site from the NPL in 1996. The site is not in use. The site can support commercial or industrial land uses.

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Site Status

In 1986, EPA issued an interim cleanup plan for the site. It included digging up contaminated sediment from on-site ponds and disposing of it in one on-site pond; placing a cap over the on-site pond; closing the site in accordance with Subtitle C of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA); and diluting water in on-site ponds and discharging diluted water to an unnamed tributary. In addition, the plan included placing institutional controls on the site property; monitoring groundwater; and inspecting and maintaining the cap.

EPA completed the last Five-Year Review for the site in 2000. The EPA does not anticipate additional work at the site.

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Work to Protect Human Health and the Environment

EPA led site investigation and cleanup activities in cooperation with TDEC. TDEC led additional cleanup activities.

EPA conducted emergency cleanup activities in 1983. EPA treated 360,000 gallons of water and dug up and disposed of 475 cubic yards of contaminated soil. In 1987, EPA dug up contaminated soil and sediment from on-site ponds, solidified the materials and placed a cap over the materials. EPA also installed monitoring wells to monitor the cap’s integrity and treated contaminated water from the on-site ponds and discharged the treated water to nearby surface water.

In 1994, TDEC conducted restoration activities at the site and took the lead on operation and maintenance activities. Following the completion of cleanup activities, EPA took the site off the NPL in 1996. In 1997, TDEC conducted additional cleanup activities, removing the cap and 12,074 tons of waste from below the cap and disposing of the waste at an off-site facility. In addition, TDEC properly abandoned eight on-site monitoring wells.

The final Five-Year Review for the site, completed in 2000, found that the cleanup continued to protect people and the environment. EPA does not anticipate additional work at the site.

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Site Risks

Risks and pathways addressed by the cleanup include health risks from people inhaling contaminated air or ingesting or touching contaminants in soil, sediment and surface water. Contamination resulted from waste handling practices at the site.

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Enforcement

The EPA was unable to identify any viable potentially responsible parties for the site. The EPA used federal funds for site cleanup activities. TDEC used state funds for additional site activities

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Renewable Energy

The EPA conducted emergency cleanup activities in 1983. The EPA treated 360,000 gallons of water and dug up and disposed of 475 cubic yards of contaminated soil.

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