Superfund Site: SMALLEY-PIPER
COLLIERVILLE, TN

Superfund Site Profile

If you need documents that are not yet 508 compliant, please contact the National 508 Coordinator, Dorothy Semazzi, at Semazzi.Dorothy@epa.gov.

SITE BACKGROUND

 

The Smalley-Piper site occupies about 9 acres in Collierville, Tennessee.  This former manufacturing site had at least two different business operations including the production of battery casings and farm equipment.  The site was in use from the 1960s to the about 2007.   EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 2005 because of contaminated groundwater, surface water, and soil resulting from facility operations. EPA and the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) have investigated site conditions and taken steps to clean up the site in order to protect human health and the environment from contamination. Site contamination does not currently threaten people living and working near the site. The soil cleanup was completed in 2012.  The groundwater treatment system was constructed during 2015 and has been in operation since December 2015.  These cleanup actions, managed by EPA and TDEC, continue to protect people and the environment from site contamination.

Commercial and industrial land uses border the site. Residential areas, including single-family homes and a mobile home park, are located a quarter-mile southeast of the site. Groundwater flows to the northwest.

From the 1960s to 2007, a farm equipment manufacturing facility operated at the site. In the 1960s, operations included farm tool manufacturing. In the 1970s, operations included battery casing manufacturing and treatment. Operations sent liquid wastes into an underground pipe that discharged to open retention ponds. The ponds treated the wastes and allowed the liquid to flow into surface water drainage ditches. Facility operations later abandoned the ponds and backfilled them with soil. The operations caused chromium and hexavalent chromium contamination in soil and groundwater. Prior to shutting down in 2007, the facility applied an iron slurry to used farm tools under high temperatures to harden the new surfaces.