Superfund Site: TEN-MILE DRAIN
ST. CLAIR SHORES, MI

Superfund Site Profile

The Michigan Department of Environmental Quality is proposing revisions to the state’s PCB standard for residential soil, also referred to as Part 201 Generic Residential Cleanup Criteria. This would revise the standard from 4 parts per million to a lower standard. This new standard may affect EPA’s proposed cleanup plans for the site.

The 2015 cleanup activities included the removal and replacement of two vaulted manhole structures, along with the 120-foot length of pipe between these vaults. Read the fact sheet EPA Updates Cleanup Progress.

The Michigan Department of Community Health has issued a “Do Not Eat” advisory for all fish taken from the Lange/Revere canals and carp and catfish caught in Lake St. Clair.

 

SITE BACKGROUND

The Ten-Mile Drain (TMD) site is located northeast of the city of Detroit, on the western shores of Lake St. Clair in St. Clair Shores, Macomb County, Michigan. The site is several blocks long and includes a portion of the TMD storm sewer system, consisting of concrete sewer pipes and the surrounding soil which are located in a utility corridor about 15 feet underground.

The area of concern for this site includes TMD storm sewer pipes in and around the intersection of Bon Brea Street and Harper Avenue in St. Clair Shores, the Lange and Revere Street canals, which connect to Lake St. Clair, and possibly other areas to be determined after further investigation and sampling.

Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are known to have migrated from a historical release of PCB-containing oil into the storm sewer system, either from a surface spill or illegal dumping, through the TMD system, and then were discharged into the canals that connect to Lake St. Clair. PCBs were present in significant quantities in the area.

Following immediate actions to remove certain PCBs in order to protect human health and the environment, site investigations and cleanup have been ongoing. The site is currently in the remedial phase of the Superfund process.



SITE PHOTO GALLERY